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University Technology Showcase Webinar Series

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University of Rochester

Featuring: "The University of Rochester Clinical and Translational Science Institute"

Tuesday, August 14, 2012 1:00-2:30 PM EDT

download slides here

 


Presenters:

Thomas A. Pearson, M.D., M.P.H., Ph.D.
Director, Clinical and Translational Science Institute
Albert D. Kaiser Professor, Department of Community and Preventive Medicine
Professor, Medicine
University of Rochester Medical Center

Peter Robinson
Vice President and Chief Operating Officer
University of Rochester Medical Center

James S. Senall
President, High Tech Rochester
Co-Founder and Managing Director, Rochester Angel Network

Richard C. Moxley, M.D.
Senior Clinician Scientist
Director, Wellstone Center
University of Rochester Medical Center

Randy N. Rosier, M.D., Ph.D.
Professor, Orthopaedics, Biochemistry and Biophysics
University of Rochester Medical Center

Yuhchyau Chen, M.D., Ph.D.
Chair and Philip Rubin Professor, Department of Radiation Oncology
University of Rochester Medical Center

Benjamin L. Miller, Ph.D.
Professor, Dermatology, Biochemistry and Biophysics, and Biomedical Engineering
University of Rochester Medical Center

Spencer Z. Rosero, M.D.
Associate Professor, Medicine/Cardiology
Director, Hereditary Arrhythmias Clinic
University of Rochester Medical Center

Daniel W. Mruzek, Ph.D.
Associate Professor, Pediatrics
Director, Human Behavior Assessment Unit
University of Rochester Medical Center

 

Moderated by:

Tony Boccanfuso, Ph.D.
Executive Director
University Industry Demonstration Partnership


Register for this webinar here:
reg(https://www2.gotomeeting.com/register/664124826)

 

ABOUT THIS WEBINAR:

The University of Rochester Clinical and Translational Science Institute (UR CTSI) is the academic home for clinical and translational science at the University. It is funded in large measure by a Clinical and Translational Science Award from the NIH. The UR was one of the first 12 institutions to earn an award under this program. Thomas A. Pearson, M.D. MPH Ph.D., serves as Principal Investigator and Program Director. The overall goals of the Institute are (1) to organize, support and expand clinical and translational research at the University within a centralized infrastructure; and (2) to integrate and collaborate with regional and national institutions to expand a national network for clinical and translational science.

The University of Rochester is a research-intensive university, receiving more than $397 million in funding awards in FY 2011, along with close to $18 million in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funding- for a total of $415 million. Building on these strong research programs and entrepreneurial faculty, the University consistently produces innovative technologies in a variety of fields, many of them fueled by research supported by the CTSI. In FY 2011, the University tallied 128 invention disclosures, naming 228 inventors from 56 University departments and units, 16 collaborators from 15 other universities and research hospitals, and six collaborators from five for-profit, private, or governmental organizations. The University filed four copyright registrations and 171 patent applications in FY 2011. Of those patent applications, 54 were new matter filings. The University was awarded 27 US patents and 22 foreign patents that year.

This webinar will provide an overview of the UR CTSI, and describe regional economic development efforts supported by UR affiliates and others. Participants will learn about the CTSI’s pilot funding program which supports investigators with innovative ideas and helps them prepare for additional funding and commercialization opportunities. Finally, four UR investigators will describe specific technologies developed with CTSI and other support.


CTSI Overview and Accomplishments
Speaker: Thomas A. Pearson, M.D., M.P.H., Ph.D.
Albert D. Kaiser Professor in the Department of Community and Preventive Medicine
Professor of Medicine at the University of Rochester School of Medicine

Summary: The University of Rochester Clinical and Translational Science Institute (UR CTSI) is the academic home for clinical and translational science at the University. It is funded in large measure by a Clinical and Translational Science Award from the NIH. The UR was one of the first 12 institutions to earn an award under this program. Thomas A. Pearson, M.D. MPH Ph.D., serves as Principal Investigator and Program Director. The overall goals of the Institute are (1) to organize, support and expand clinical and translational research at the University within a centralized infrastructure; and (2) to integrate and collaborate with regional and national institutions to expand a national network for clinical and translational science.

The UR CTSI is located in the new 200,000 sq. ft., LEED-certified (at the gold level) Saunders Research Building at the University of Rochester Medical Center. The building is one of the first of its kind in the nation, and provides specially-designed space where faculty conducting clinical and translational research work alongside students and trainees in existing and new degree-granting programs. Groundbreaking took place in October 2008 and the building opened in April 2011. Also within the building are supporting regulatory and administrative functions, and faculty working in collaborative disciplines such as biostatistics, epidemiology, and biomedical informatics. The UR CTSI acts has a hub, integrating the clinical and translational science functions contained in the Saunders Research Building with four affiliated URMC research centers, namely the Center for Human Experimental Therapeutics, the Clinical Research Center, the Center for Research Implementation and Translation, and the Center for Community Health.

Significant accomplishments of the UR CTSI include the following:

  • During its first four years, the CTSI distributed peer-reviewed pilot funding valued at about $4.1 million, resulting in additional extramural grants valued at $27.6 million.
  • Over 200 junior faculty and students have completed CTSI training programs in clinical and translational science. In the aggregate, they have received extramural grant awards totaling almost $60 million and have published about 1,900 papers in peer-reviewed journals, about 850 as first author.
  • The UR CTSI established an innovative new Ph.D. program in Translational Biomedical Science, one of the first of its kind in the nation. The goal of the program is to prepare individuals for academic and clinical careers relating to the translation of basic biomedical research into clinical strategies to improve health.
  • The CTSI provided the Clinical Research Center with a newly-renovated 10,500 sq. ft. facility across the street from the Saunders Research Building, with enhanced research support infrastructure and street-level access for volunteer subjects. A satellite of the Clinical Research Center was built in the Saunders Research Building to provide additional convenient space for minimal risk outpatient studies.
  • The UR CTSI led the formation of and supports the UNYTE Translational Research Network, currently made up of 18 biomedical research institutions in Upstate New York, dedicated to promoting research collaborations among member institutions and sharing research resources. UNYTE developed a model for collaborative IRB review of multi-site protocols to accelerate the approval time for research studies conducted within the network.
  • The UR CTSI established a Research Navigator Program to facilitate, accelerate and improve collaboration in clinical and translational research within the URMC, across the UNYTE network, and throughout the CTSA Consortium.
  • The UR CTSI initiated and supports the Greater Rochester Practice-Based Research Network, which now consists of 85 pediatric, internal medicine and family medicine practices that serve 30% of the adult and 80% of the pediatric population in the region.


(1) In Vitro Model: 3D bone marrow culture bioreactor
(2) In Vivo Model: Human TPO receptor (c-Mpl) knock-in mouse model
Developers: Yuhchyau Chen, M.D., Ph.D. and J.H. David Wu, Ph.D.
Speaker:  Yuhchyau Chen, M.D., Ph.D. 
Philip Rubin Professor
Chair of the Department of Radiation Oncology.
University of Rochester

Abstract:
(1) In Vitro Model: 3D bone marrow culture bioreactor

Bone marrow is the primary organ for hematopoiesis and a primary lymphoid organ. Its intricate, three-dimensional architecture facilitates cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions and provides a microenvironment supporting self-renewal and multilineal differentiation of the hematopoietic stem cells. We have developed an ex vivo bone marrow bioreactor, which supports three-dimensional growth configuration with high cell density and intimate physical contact between hematopoietic and stromal cells. In contrast to the conventional culture system, the 3D culture system supports multilineal hematopoiesis, including the development of myeloid, erythroid, and lymphoid lineages. The bone marrow model thus provides a more physiologically meaningful approach for delineating the hematopoietic microenvironment important for stem cell self-renewal and differentiation, potentially leading to novel bone marrow technologies. One important application is to use the 3D bone marrow culture system for drug discovery and pre-clinical testing. The other application is for in vitro genotoxicity testing of drugs and environmental agents.

(2) In Vivo Model: Human TPO receptor (c-Mpl) knock-in mouse model

Thrombopoietin (TPO) is the key endogenous thrombopoietic cytokine and a ligand that binds to and activates the proto-oncogene cytokine receptor c-Mpl. Recombinant human thrombopoietin (rhTPO) and its shorter, pegylated recombinant megakaryocyte growth and development factor (PEG-rhMGDF) were developed, but unfortunately were associated with autoantibody formation. Stimulating platelet production remains under development in the management of thrombocytopenia. Second generation thrombopoietic growth factors with unique pharmacological properties have been developed, which include peptide mimetics, such as AMG 531,which activates the cMpl (TPO receptor) through the extracellular domain, and the TPO non-peptide mimetics, such as NIP-004, eltrombopag and other developing small molecules. These non-peptide TPO mimetics bind and activate the cMpl trans-membrane (TM) domain instead of the extracellular domain.

These newer agents increase platelet counts by binding and activating the TPO receptor (TPO-R), c-Mpl. However, discovery and development of TPO mimetics have been challenging because of the species specificity of these newer agents that limits the experimental models for pre-clinical investigations. The non-peptide mimetics (NIP-004 and eltrombopag) have strict species specificity to humans and chimpanzees only, while the peptide mimetic such as AMG531 has partial species specificity and requires supraphysiologic concentrations to demonstrate thrombogenic effects in animal models. The species-specificity of eltrombopag and NIP-004 resides in the transmembrane domain at the Histidine 499 amino acid. To overcome the species specificity of newer agents and to facilitate the ease of drug screening of TPO mimetics, we have developed two human TPO receptor (c-Mpl) Knock-in (KI) mouse models with different DNA constructs. The MplhmMPL KI mouse model contains chimeric human DNA of the extracellular domain, human DNA of the TM domain and mouse genomic DNA of cytoplasmic domain. The MplhTM KI mouse model contains chimeric mouse genomic DNA of extracellular domain, human DNA of TM, and mouse genomic DNA of cytoplasmic domain. Both DNA constructs have the critical amino acid in human TM domain (His499). These mouse models can be useful for drug discovery, screening and pre-clinical testing.


Arrayed Imaging Reflectometry
Speaker: Benjamin L. Miller, Ph. D.
Professor of Dermatology, Biochemistry and Biophysics, and Biomedical Engineering
University of Rochester

Abstract: We have developed a technology that addresses most, if not all, of the limitations of current assays. Arrayed Imaging Reflectometry (“AIR”) relies on the creation of a near-perfect antireflective coating on a silicon chip. When a target biomolecule binds to an immobilized biomolecule on the chip, this antireflective condition is perturbed causing light to reflect in proportion to the amount of target molecule captured. AIR is compatible with standard microarray fabrication technologies, allowing 100’s to 1000’s of targets to be probed simultaneously. The system has no scanning optics and does not require temperature control, making it relatively inexpensive and simple to operate. We have demonstrated AIR in the context of both antibody and antigen arrays, with limits of detection in the pg/mL range for several targets in human serum, and high dynamic range. The University has licensed this technology to Adarza BioSystems, Inc., which is working to commercialize AIR in collaboration with our lab.Many areas of basic biomedical research and medical diagnostics require the ability to simultaneously detect large numbers of target biomolecules – for example, panels of putative “biomarker” proteins. Currently available technologies are generally able to do this with small numbers of protein targets, but are limited in how many targets can be multiplexed, or have other problems including complex workflow, the need for expensive secondary detection reagents, or (for many “label free” technologies) limited sensitivity and compatibility with complex sample matrices.


Implantable Living Cell based Biosensors for Real Time Monitoring
Speaker: Dr. Spencer Rosero, M.D.
Associate Professor of Medicine/Cardiology
Director of the Hereditary Arrhythmias Clinic
University of Rochester

Abstract: The team at the University of Rochester has developed a technology facilitating the integration of living cells with opto-electronics to produce a biology-based, real-time biosensor that is implantable. The approach uses an implantable cell chamber in which genetically engineered cells are housed with optoelectronics and subsequently implanted in the mouse subcutaneous space for an extended period of time. The concept is to continuously monitor biomarker fluctuations so that pathophysiologic changes and the body’s response could be predicted. In the future, rather than having a few isolated (“snapshots”) measures of biomarkers taken during visits to the doctor, the emerging capabilities stemming from molecular biology techniques, imaging, and wireless transmission facilitate the collection of clinically relevant data nearly continuously, or as needed. These objectives could be met by using living cells as sensors, which are subsequently integrated into an implantable microenvironment. Long term, we believe it may be possible to use a cell–integrated biosensor platform in building datacentric models to predict an individual’s future state of health.


The Quick Trainer (QT)
Developers: Daniel W. Mruzek, Ph.D. and Stephen McAleavey, Ph.D.
Speaker: Daniel W. Mruzek, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Pediatrics
Director of the URMC Human Behavior Assessment Unit
University of Rochester

Abstract: The Quick Trainer (QT) is a wireless moisture pager that alerts a child and his or her parents/caretakers regarding the onset of the child’s urination into his or her clothing, as part of a systematic toilet training protocol. It consists of a wireless pager unit that is attached to the child’s clothing with Velcro or placed in a convenient location in the training environment and a disposable soft sensor that attaches to the inside of the child’s underwear. This technology is paired with a curriculum based on behavior modification, most notably positive reinforcement for successful use of the toilet across repeated pairings with the pager. In intramurally-funded pilot testing of the QT, three of four individuals with severe developmental disabilities who had previously experienced training failure with standard toilet training strategies demonstrated substantial progress with independent toileting. Implications for toilet training with individuals with developmental disabilities, as well as the general population, will be presented.

 

ABOUT THE PRESENTERS:

thomas

Thomas A. Pearson, M.D., M.P.H., Ph.D.
Albert D. Kaiser Professor in the Department of Community and Preventive Medicine
Professor of Medicine at the University of Rochester School of Medicine

Thomas A. Pearson is the Albert D. Kaiser Professor in the Department of Community and Preventive Medicine and Professor of      Medicine at the University of Rochester School of Medicine. Dr. Pearson is also Senior Associate Dean for Clinical Research at        the  University of Rochester Medical Center and directs the Rochester Prevention Research Center. He is Principal Investigator of      the  Rochester Clinical and Translational Science Award and directs the Rochester Clinical and Translational Science Institute. Dr. Pearson’s major research interests are in the epidemiology and prevention of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, with a special interest in the international trends of coronary heart disease and stroke. He has actively participated in basic science studies, clinical investigations, and community-based projects. Dr. Pearson received his Doctor of Medicine, Master in Public Health, and Doctor of Philosophy in cardiovascular epidemiology, all from The Johns Hopkins University, where he also completed residencies in preventive medicine and internal medicine and a fellowship in cardiology. He holds board certifications in Internal Medicine, Preventive Medicine, and Clinical Lipidology. Dr. Pearson is a Fellow of the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, the American College of Preventive Medicine, and the American College of Physicians. Dr. Pearson has served as a member and chair of important committees of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, the Institute of Medicine, the American Heart Association, and the American College of Cardiology. He also was a member of the Advisory Group for the 2010 U.S. Dietary Guidelines. For the National Forum for Prevention of Heart Disease and Stroke, he serves as Chair of its Board of Directors. He currently chairs the Guideline Implementation Working Group as part of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute’s Guideline Development Program. He has lectured and published extensively in the prevention of cardiovascular disease, at the patient, healthcare system, community, and public policy levels.

 

peter

Peter Robinson
Vice President and Chief Operating Officer
University of Rochester Medical Center

Peter Robinson is the Vice President and Chief Operating Officer of the University of Rochester Medical Center. In January 2004, Mr. Robinson was appointed to the additional responsibility of Executive Director of Government and Community Relations for the University. He also has responsibility for the University’s role in economic development. Mr. Robinson is a voting member of the New York State Public Health & Health Planning Council; the Chairman of the Board of High Technology of Rochester, Inc. (HTR); Excell Partners, Inc.; New York State Biotechnology Association (NYBA); and Vice Chair for Greater Rochester Enterprise. He serves on the boards of several private and public community agencies. He earned his Bachelor’s degree from the City College of New York and Master’s degrees from the New School for Social Research and Columbia University.

 

Jim

James S. Senall
HTR President
Co-founder, Managing Director
Rochester Angel Network

Jim holds a Bachelors Degree in Electrical Engineering from Rochester Institute of Technology, an MBA in Marketing and Entrepreneurship from the Simon School of Business (University of Rochester), and is a member of Beta Gamma Sigma National Business Honor Society. He currently serves as Chairman of the Business Incubator Association of New York State, is a Board member of the New York State Economic Development Council, serves on the Executive Committee of the University of Rochester’s Technology Development Fund, and is a Board member at Adarza BioSystems, a medical device startup company.Prior to GRE, Jim worked as a consultant to several early stage technology companies, and before that, was employed by Advanced Vision Technologies, a semiconductor/MEMS startup where he was involved in raising several million dollars in venture funding. Additional experience includes various operational and engineering assignments at TYCO Electronics in Pennsylvania and North Carolina.Prior to joining HTR, Jim was Managing Director of Business Development at Greater Rochester Enterprise (GRE), where he was responsible for growing the local emerging business sector. Achievements included formation of the Rochester Angel Network, the RENEW NY virtual business incubator, business plan contests, and several other initiatives. Jim also led efforts at GRE to identify emerging industry sectors for regional growth, with particular focus on the Clean Tech sector. Jim developed and implemented a strategic plan focused on wind, solar, biofuel, and fuel cell opportunities, which included local cluster development, business attraction, and matchmaking activities.Jim Senall joined HTR as President in February 2009. He has full P&L and management responsibility for a 15-person, $3M organization that supports technology commercialization, business incubation, and growth services for companies in the nine-county Greater Rochester, NY Region. Jim is also a co-founder and the Managing Director of the Rochester Angel Network, a group of 35 accredited investors interested in seed and early stage opportunities.

 

richard

Richard C. Moxley, M.D., Ph.D.
Senior Clinician-Scientist, Director
Wellstone Center at the University of Rochester

Richard C. Moxley is a senior clinician-scientist and former Chair of Neurology who is an expert in muscle diseases and is involved in development and clinical trials of novel treatments for these disorders. He directs a Wellstone Center at the University of Rochester focused on new therapies for muscle disease. The Pilot and Collaborative key function co-directed by Dr. Rosier and Dr. Moxley has overseen a wide array of pilot project submissions and funding of projects in every area of basic and clinical biomedical science during the course of the CTSI, with a tremendous return on investment in terms of both intellectual property and new outside research funding.

 

randy

Randy N. Rosier, M.D., Ph.D.
Professor of Orthopaedics, Biochemistry and Biophysics
University of Rochester

Randy N. Rosier is a Professor of Orthopaedics, Biochemistry and Biophysics at the University of Rochester. He has practiced as an orthopaedic oncologist at this institution since 1984, and initiated the metabolic bone service as well as the musculoskeletal tumor service at the University of Rochester. He has been actively involved in the molecular biology of tumor metastases, bone development, and cartilage with NIH funding for the past 25 years for his research in these areas. His current research is in the area of development of novel therapeutics for osteoarthritis. Dr. Rosier was former chair of the Department of Orthopaedics from 2000-2007, and during that time established the Center for Musculoskeletal Research at the University of Rochester, which has consistently ranked among the few best funded such enterprises nationally. Since the initial funding of the University of Rochester’s CTSI six years ago, Dr. Rosier has co-directed the Pilot and Collaborative Studies key function of the CTSI with Professor Richard Moxley from the Department of Neurology.

 

chen

Yuhchyau Chen, M.D., Ph.D. 
Philip Rubin Professor
Chair of the Department of Radiation Oncology.
University of Rochester

Yuhchyau Chen is the Philip Rubin Professor and Chair of the Department of Radiation Oncology. Dr. Chen received her B.S. from the National Taiwan University in 1976, her Ph.D. in Experimental Pathology (1988) and her M.D. (1990) from the University of Washington. Following that, she did a medical internship at Virginia Mason Hospital and a residency program in Massachusetts General Hospital. She joined the faculty at the University of Rochester in 1995.

Dr. Chen is a physician scientist specializing in Radiation Oncology. Her professional activities have been focused on clinical and translational research in radiation biology and cancer research. Her interests include radiation biomarkers, translational drug development, radiosensitization, radioprotection, radiation normal tissue effects (specifically, lung and bone marrow), radiation genotoxicity, and integrating chemotherapeutic agents with radiation. She has conducted more than 20 clinical and translational trials as PI or sub-PI in investigator-initiated studies, industry-initiated studies, and studies of cooperative groups. Many of these studies were conducted for FDA approval of new agents for cancer therapy management. She has enrolled patients in more than 30 cooperative group trials through RTOG, ECOG, SWOG, and in industry sponsored trials. She has specialized in radiation cytokine and genotoxic markers. Her translational research of cytokine markers for radiation pneumonitis was the first published work of human data on IL-6 and IL-1 for radiation pneumonitis. She was the scientific project leader (project 4) of radiation bone marrow genotoxicity of the NIAID U19 center grant from 2005-2010, and she was the Core Leader of the Translational Drug Development Core on the NIAID U19 Center for Medical Countermeasures against Radiation from 2010-2011. She was the Program Director and PI of the current BARDA contract in developing eltrombopag for the treatment of acute radiation hematopoietic syndrome. She is the Sponsor-Investigator for a phase I clinical trial using eltrombopag to promote thrombopoiesis in stem cell transplant patients receiving total body irradiation, and in developing pre-clinical animal models for radiation investigations.

Dr. Chen is on the editorial boards of Frontiers in Thoracic Oncology; World Journal of Radiology; and Open Journal of Blood Diseases. She is a member of American Medical Association; International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer; American Association for Women Radiologists; American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology; American Society of Clinical Oncology, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group; Southwest Oncology Group; Radiation Research Society; and the Monroe County Medical Society. Dr. Chen has been an ad hoc grant reviewer of NCI/NIH, Study Section for Radiation Therapeutics and Biology, Center for Scientific Review; NIAID/NIH, Radiation/Nuclear Medical Countermeasures Program—NIH Intramural Laboratory Collaboration Funding Opportunity; Defense Threat Reduction Agency/Combating Weapons of Mass Destruction Broad Agency Announcement, U.S. Civilian Research & Development Foundation Cooperative Grants Program; and Cancer Study Section Grant Reviewer: Tobacco-Related Disease.

 

david

J.H. David Wu, PhD.
Professor, Chemical Engineering and Biomedical Engineering
University of Rochester

J.H. David Wu is a Professor of Chemical Engineering and Biomedical Engineering at the University of Rochester. He was born in Taiwan and received B.S. and M.S. degrees in Biochemical Science and Technology (formerly known as Agricultural Chemistry) from the National Taiwan University in 1976 and 1980, respectively. He earned his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Biochemical Engineering from MIT in 1982 and 1987, respectively.

Dr. Wu is a leader in studying the biomass-degrading enzyme system of Clostridium thermocellum, a key bacterium in “Consolidated Processing” leading to bio-ethanol production. He directs a DOE-funded consortium to develop biomolecular strategies toward biofuel production employing this bacterium. His work has led to the discoveries of the modular structure of the now well-known cellulosomal scaffolding protein, the unique Family 48 of glycosyl hydrolases, the novel 3-D structure of the cellulosomal dockerin, and the first cellulase transcriptional regulator and operon in C. thermocellum.

At the University of Rochester, he developed a novel 3-D bone marrow culture system conducive to multi-lineal blood cell differentiation. The 3-D culture system has been used as a model in three NIH- or BARDA-funded centers on developing countermeasures against bioterrorism, including vaccines and anti-radiation drugs. His research group continues to investigate the cellulosome mechanism, and transcription regulation concerning biomass degradation and bioethanol fermentation at the genome scale as well as molecular events governing blood cell formation.

Professor Wu is a Fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology (AAM), a Fellow of the Society for Industrial Microbiology (SIM), and a Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering. He is a recipient of the SIM Waksman Outstanding Educator Award. He has twice won the awards for excellence in teaching from the Undergraduate Engineering Council of the University of Rochester. He served as an editor for Industrial Biotechnology and was on the editorial boards of the Journal of Bioscience and Bioengineering and Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology. He is also an editor for the ASM Manual of Industrial Microbiology and Biotechnology (Second Edition). He served as the ASM Div. O Chair in 1997/1998 and was the Divisional Lecturer in 2002. He has served as a reviewer for various federal programs on bioenergy or tissue engineering, including those of DOE, DOE-GTL, NSF, NIH, and NREL. He also served as a Scientific Advisor to NYSTAR (the New York State Foundation for Science, Technology & Innovation), and a Program Co-Chair for the SIM Annual Meeting. Professor Wu has also been involved in interactional collaborations. He served as a Visiting Professor to the International Biotechnology Center of Osaka University in Japan and an Adjunct Professor of National Cheng-Kung University in Taiwan. He is currently an Adjunct Professor of Jiangsu University in China. In addition, he has given lectures in many different countries.

 

ben

Prof. Benjamin L. Miller, Ph. D.
Professor of Dermatology, Biochemistry and Biophysics, and Biomedical Engineering
University of Rochester

Benjamin L. Miller is a Professor of Dermatology, Biochemistry and Biophysics, and Biomedical Engineering at the University of Rochester. Raised in southwestern Ohio, Dr. Miller carried out his undergraduate studies at Miami University, receiving degrees in Chemistry (B.S.), Mathematics (A.B.), and German (A.B.) in 1988. After acquiring a Ph. D. in Chemistry from Stanford University and carrying out postdoctoral research at Harvard University, Dr. Miller joined the faculty of the University of Rochester in 1996. Research in his group has included projects directed towards methods of non-biopolymeric molecular evolution (that is, how can we set up conditions such that a group of molecules will evolve towards having properties we want?), molecular recognition (how can we understand and control the interactions of biologically “interesting” molecules?), computer-aided molecular design, synthetic methodology, and materials science. Most recently, Dr. Miller has focused on using his group’s expertise in molecular recognition chemistry, nanotechnology, and chip-based biomolecular sensing systems to aid in the development of novel biosensors and rapid diagnostic tools, as well as continuing to attack the problem of sequence-selective RNA recognition. He is an active entrepreneur, and is a founder of Adarza Biosystems, Inc., a Rochester area biomedical start-up company.

A few scientific highlights from Dr. Miller’s research group include:

• Pioneering the concept of Dynamic Combinatorial Chemistry (1996-today): Developed simultaneously by Dr. Miller’s group and two groups in Europe, this has grown into a field pursued world-wide as a way to “evolve” interesting molecules.

• In collaboration with Dr. Philippe Fauchet, developing a silicon-based digital analog of the Gram stain (2001): a chip-based replacement for a bacterial identification method in continuous use since the 1880’s.

• Development of Arrayed Imaging Reflectometry, a label-free, highly sensitive silicon chip-based technology for protein profiling (2004-today).

• Design of the first synthetic molecules able to interfere with the molecular cause of the major form of adult onset muscular dystrophy (2008). Dr. Miller’s group has also developed molecules currently in preclinical study as potential therapeutics for Alzheimer’s disease and AIDS.

Dr. Miller has been Chair or co-Chair of several international symposia. He is the recipient of a Research Corporation Research Innovation Award (1998), the Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Award (2001), the Rochester Business Journal Health Care Achievement Award (2009), and the Future of Health Technology Institute’s Future of Health Technology Award (2010).

 

spencer

Spencer Z. Rosero, M.D. 
Associate Professor of Medicine/Cardiology
Director of the Hereditary Arrhythmias Clinic
University of Rochester

Spencer Rosero is an Associate Professor of Medicine/Cardiology and Director of the Hereditary Arrhythmias Clinic at the University of Rochester. As a cardiac electrophysiologist, he specializes in the treatment of heart rhythm disorders that require the use implantable technologies such as pacemakers, defibrillators (ICD’s), and resynchronization devices. He also specializes in performing complex radiofrequency catheter ablations of abnormal heart rhythms, including SVT, atrial fibrillation, as well as life threatening ventricular tachycardias responsible for sudden cardiac death.

Dr. Rosero received his M.D. degree from Downstate College of Medicine at the State University of New York, and holds an M.S. degree in Pharmacology from the University of Rochester. In addition to direct patient care, he is actively engaged in academic and research activities. Dr. Rosero has authored numerous scholarly publications and holds several patents in his field. His research interests include the development of novel futuristic implantable biosensors that provide real-time health monitoring, experimental implantable device therapeutics, and trying to better understand hereditary arrhythmias, such as long QT syndrome. The cell embedded biosensor technology developed by Dr. Rosero at the University of Rochester Medical Center utilizes living cells within an implantable microenvironment to provide real-time sensing.

 

daniel

Daniel W. Mruzek, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Pediatrics
Director of the URMC Human Behavior Assessment Unit
University of Rochester

Daniel W. Mruzek, Ph.D. graduated from the Ohio State University in 1996 with a doctorate in psychology. His background in psychology includes doctoral and postdoctoral training specifically in the area of developmental disabilities, both clinical service and research. He is the former Director of Early Childhood Services at the Groden Center in Providence, RI and joined the faculty of the University of Rochester Medical Center in 2002. He is currently an Associate Professor of Pediatrics and Director of the URMC Human Behavior Assessment Unit. As a licensed psychologist and board certified behavior analyst, Dr. Mruzek specializes in service to children with developmental disabilities through clinical service, research and teaching. His clinical practice includes supporting children with autism and their families through the Division of Neurodevelopmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, including school-and home-based, behavioral intervention and family support (e.g., parent training). His research activities include participation on NIH-funded studies investigating the core symptoms of ASD and effectiveness of specific autism interventions. Dr. Mruzek’s teaching responsibilities include offering a graduate level course on Autism through the UR Warner School of Education and serving as Psychology Discipline Coordinator for the UR Leadership in Neurodevelopmental Disorders (LEND) training program for newly minted professionals. Dr Mruzek is on the Board of Directors of the Association for Science in Autism Treatment and Board of Editors for Focus on Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities, a peer-reviewed, scientific journal. He has authored and co-authored several peer-reviewed publications and book chapters.

 

ABOUT THE MODERATOR:

Tony Boccanfuso, Ph.D.
Executive Director
University Industry Demonstration Partnership

Anthony (Tony) Boccanfuso serves as the Executive Director for the National Academies' University Industry Demonstration Partnership (UIDP) . He holds a Ph.D. in Inorganic Chemistry from the University of South Carolina and earned his B.S. in Political Science and Chemistry from Furman University. Dr. Boccanfuso began his professional career as a Science Policy Fellow at the American Chemical Society where he worked within the society's government relations and science policy division. Before taking on this position, Dr. Boccanfuso was Director for Research and Economic Development at the University of South Carolina and currently retains the position of Senior Director for Strategic Alliances within the College of Engineering and Computing. Dr. Boccanfuso has had a distinguished career in the research management and science policy arenas and has held a variety of positions at the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health and PricewaterhouseCoopers as well as several universities. He currently serves on several boards including the National Hydrogen Association, the MedStar Health Research Institute and the Hydrogen Education Foundation for which he is the current chair.

 

 

IMPORTANT INFORMATION FOR ATTENDEES:

WEBINAR DURATION: Each session is a 90-minute webinar with 60 minutes of presentation and 30 minutes of Q&A.

COST: Free, but registration required by clicking on the Register button above. 

HOW TO PARTICIPATE?: This webinar is online. You need a computer with web access for the visual/audio. You may also dial-in using the audio-only telephone number. The call in details and instructions on how to join the webinar will be sent to you via email after you register. Once registered to the webinar you will receive a reminder email 24 hours before the start of the webinar with instructions on how to join.

QUESTIONS TO SPEAKERS: Q&A is conducted by a chat box to the speakers.

WHO SHOULD PARTICIPATE IN THE WEBINAR?: Angel investors, venture capitalists, large companies, entrepreneurs, SBIR companies, federal lab researchers, federal agency representatives, and others who want to learn more about technologies highlighted during the webinar.

SLIDES AND VIDEO: The slide presentations and video recording will be available on this page. If you are unable to join the live webinar, you may view the recorded video that will be posted within 24 hours after the scheduled webinar ends.